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  1. says

    I’m with you – finicky sourdough is still a little intimidating for me. I’ve been meaning to search for a recipe for soaked grain bread for a while now, and this looks like a great place to start – it’s on the menu for this week. Thanks, Tiffany!

    • Tiffany says

      Hi Gayle! My easiest source for whey is straining homemade yogurt. If I’m REALLY on top of things, I can pour it off from sour cream too, but that doesn’t always happen. I bake bread in loaf pans to keep the long shape, but after punching down, I roll into a square/rectangle, fold into thirds and roll up from the end.

  2. says

    I, too, have Nourishing Traditions and got into soaking my beans and grains all the time. I had the same problem with my sourdough starter and eventually it got to be way too sour. So I quit! More recently, I’ve ditched wheat due to health concerns – after reading Wheat Belly and similar publications. Wondering what your take on that is, the fact that the wheat (even whole wheat) we have today resembles nothing like the original grain.

    So, I’ve sadly given it up, though it sneaks in here and there. It started when I realized we were having bread-related things for EVERY meal – pancakes for breakfast, sandwiches for lunch, pasta for dinner. Trying to stick with protein, healthy fats, and other forms of carbs (fruits and veggies, rice, potatoes).

    • Tiffany says

      My thoughts on wheat… I know the wheat today is very different from the wheat long ago, so I’ve been trying to limit our grains to “one” at a meal (which includes all starches) and using more spelt where I can. We actually prefer the taste of spelt, but it’s rises out, not up, so I have to include some wheat in bread to make it go up. But nearly everything that’s non-yeast (pancakes, muffins, cookies, etc.) are made with spelt now. Plus I make bread just once/week, and when we’re out, we’re out!

      I’m also using rye and other flours as well to cut back on the wheat. Another option is einkorn wheat, but I haven’t tried it yet and don’t know how it varies in terms of baking properties from the wheat we’re used to.

  3. Bess Hume says

    Thank you so much for this recipe! Question: Have you read about butter interfering with the soaking process?

    • Tiffany says

      Thanks Bess! No, I have not… and since it came from NT, I didn’t even think twice! Do you have any links to share?

    • Tiffany says

      Hi Bess! I experimented with our bread last week, leaving the butter out until post-soaking – it came out great! If you’re concerned, soak w/medium & grains. Next day, add softened butter (not melted) to the dough and you’re good. :)

  4. says

    Thank you so much for this recipe. I have tried soaking my grains before making bread, but I never found a recipe I really liked. I’m definitely going to give this one a try. Thanks for the spelt reminder. It’s been awhile since I have used it, but I am looking forward to trying it again. Your pictures are beautiful!

  5. Amy H. says

    Thanks so much for sharing this! I’ve made it twice since you posted it and we are loving it. I’ve been doing sourdough (using the “bucket” method) in recent months, but my family is complaining that the crust is too hard, so I was very excited to see this post. It has the softness my family wants, but the soaking that I think is most important! The second time I made it, after step 3, I put everything in the bread maker on the dough cycle. Then took it out and put it in the loaf pans for the second rise. This worked beautifully, so I think I’ll keep doing it that way :)

  6. Paige says

    Thanks for this recipe! I have made countless loaves of soaked whole wheat bread that were too crumbly to use for sandwiches. I finally gave up and went back to either unsoaked whole wheat or unbleached organic bread flour. My second batch is rising as I type this and hopefully it will be as delightful as the last batch. I doubled the recipe and used my Bosch mixer. This is our new go-to recipe!!!! Thanks again……..I am forever grateful!!

  7. emily says

    I know i’m late to comment, but i wanted to say THANK YOU for a great recipe! This has become our go-to bread for the weeks when i don’t feel like baking sourdough bread (my husband likes a European-style bread that i have to start three days before baking…which doesn’t always happen!).

    I double your recipe and bake it in three 9-inch loaf pans (I freeze two loaves and let them thaw as needed) — that lasts my small family about a week and a half. I like to substitute 1/3 to 1/2 cup wheat germ for an equal amount of the whole-wheat flour for extra flavour and nutrition.

    • Tiffany says

      It’s never to late to comment, and you’re most welcome! I’m not sure I could do bread 3 days out either… I’m lucky if I remember the night before, lol. Brilliant idea on doubling for more loaves. Less time in the kitchen is always a good thing. :)

  8. Angie says

    I have been making homemade bread for a while now and settled on one recipe but I love the idea of soaking the grains first. I have kids and hectic schedules so I also like the idea of freezing a loaf or two but have never done this. Do you bake the bread and then freeze or freeze the dough? I am not a baker to say the least! I consider myself a great recipe-follower cook! Any help is appreciated. Thanks.

    • Tiffany says

      Hi Angie! You bake, then freeze the bread. Some dough recipes can be frozen before baking, like biscuits or even pizza dough, but I’ve never preferred the end result that way. To make it REALLY easy later, you can even slice the bread before freezing. Regardless, wrap the bread twice – once w/plastic warp & then in a gallon bag – so it doesn’t get freezer burn. Simply re-use the plastic wrap each week!

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